If injured on the hob

IF YOU ARE INJURED AT WORK

The first step is to tell your supervisor and file an incident report if you are injured at work. Because these injuries happened on the job, you are entitled to compensation for wage loss and rehabilitation. In order to make sure that you are compensated for your injury, call Franks & Rechenberg, P.C.  David N. Rechenberg has guided people through the worker’s compensation system for 18 years. We can assist you in getting a just settlement or award.

 total knee replacement

TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT / KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

Total knee replacement surgery is called Knee Arthroplasty. A total knee replacement is a surgical procedure where the surgeon removes the patient’s existing knee joint and replaces it with an artificial metal knee. The knee is the largest joint in the body. According to studies, there are over 575,000 knee replacements performed each year in the United States alone. The knee joint is where the thigh bone and shin bone and knee cap all meet. The thigh bone is called femur, the shin bone is called the tibia and the knee cap is called the patella. Where these bones come together there is cartilage which allows the bones to move easily and without friction and no pain under normal conditions.

Knee replacement surgery usually occurs when the cartilage in a person’s knee joint has disappeared and the bones that make up the knee joint are rubbing on each other. Studies have shown that more than 90% of people who undergo a surgical total knee replacement have a substantial decrease in knee pain and a significant improvement in using their knee during daily life activities.

 slide 26total-hip-replacement

TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

A total hip replacement is called total hip arthroplasty. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball of this joint is the top part of the thigh bone (femur) which connects to the socket in the pelvis bone. The area where the thigh bone is connected to the hip bone is called the acetabulum.

When a total hip replacement is performed, the surgeon will insert a metal artificial ball and stem into the femur bone and insert a plastic cup socket into the hip bone and then connect the metal ball into the plastic socket. The medical community refers to the artificial hip replacement joint as a prosthesis.

The three common causes for a total hip replacement include: 1) trauma to the hip joint, 2) degenerative arthritis, and 3) congenital abnormality of the hip.

 slide 25rotator-cuff

ROTATOR CUFF TEAR

The rotator cuff is a network of four (4) tendons or muscles that surround the top of the shoulder. The rotator cuff keeps the arm in place in the shoulder joint and allows the arm to move. The four (4) muscles that make up the rotator cuff are: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and the teres minor muscles. These muscles are attached to tendons which are attached to the bones. The most common rotator cuff tear is a tear in the supraspinatus, tendon and muscle.

Rotator cuff tears are usually caused by a single traumatic event like a car crash or a work injury, or overuse of the shoulder joint by repetitive movements. Statistically, most repetitive trauma rotator cuff tears occur in individuals over 40 years old.

The diagnosis of a rotator cuff tear is confirmed through an MRI after an examination by a physician. This test allows the doctor to see what part of the rotator cuff is damaged. If a person has a rotator cuff tear, non-surgical treatment options include anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy and steroid injections. The surgical treatment options for a rotator cuff tear are either arthroscopic or an open repair.

 slide 23sudden-incident

SUDDEN INCIDENT / SUDDEN INJURIES

Single incident or sudden injuries are what most people think of when talking about worker’s comp issues. For example, a UPS driver lifts a heavy box and pulls a muscle in his back, or someone slips and falls on a slippery floor and lands on their shoulder. Single incident or sudden injuries such as these may be compensable by worker’s comp.

 slide 24repetitive-stress

REPETITIVE STRESS INJURIES

These injuries can be the same as the single incident injuries. Only the cause is different. Instead of a single incident, injuries can result from years of repetitive stress. Whether it happens all at once, or over a period of months or years, we have handled worker’s compensation cases that involved:

Rotator cuff tear
Torn ACL (anterior cruciate ligament)
Torn MCL (medial collateral ligament)
Torn meniscus Back injury, e.g. bulging disk or herniated disc
Neck injury
Knee / hip replacement
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Hearing loss
Heart attack / stroke
Lateral epicondylitis
Cubital tunnel syndrome
Tarsal tunnel syndrome
Ulnar nerve transposition RSD (reflex sympathetic dystrophy)

 slide 22reflex-sympathy-dystrophy

REFLEX SYMPATHY DYSTROPHY

Reflex Sympathy Dystrophy is a disorder characterized by chronic severe pain. This sometimes include pain in the arms, fingers and palms of the hand, although it may occur in the legs. If there is an affected area of the skin, it may be extremely sensitive to touch or weather changes. The effective limbs may also perspire excessively.

 slide 21epidural-steroid-injection

EPIDURAL STEROID INJECTION

 slide 19laminectomy

LAMINECTOMY FOR HERNIATED DISC

 slide 20spinalfusion

SPINAL FUSION SURGERY

 slide 18discectomy

DISCECTOMY FOR HERNIATED DISC

 slide 17myocardial-infarction

HEART ATTACK / MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

 slide 16herniated-disc

HERNIATED DISC

 slide 15bulging-disc

BULGING DISC

 slide 14torn-annulus

TORN ANNULUS

 slide 13jumpers-knee

JUMPER’S KNEE / PATELLA FEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME

 slide 11anterior-cruciate-ligament

ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY

 slide 12MCL-LCL

MCL INJURY & LCL INJURY

 slide 10tornmeniscus

TORN MENISCUS OF THE KNEE

 slide 9tornlabrum

TORN LABRUM

 slide 7tennis-elbow

TENNIS ELBOW / LATERAL EPICHONDYLITIS

 slide 8shoulder-impingement

SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

 slide 6hernia

INGUINAL HERNIA

slide 5trigger-finger

TRIGGER FINGER / STENOSISING TENOSYNOVITS

 slide 4de-quervains-disease

DE QUERVAIN’S DISEASE

 carpal tunnel syndrome

CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a compression of the median nerve at the wrist and the carpal tunnel. The median nerve and the tendons that bend the fingers pass through the carpal tunnel which is formed by wrist bones on three sides with a thick ligament as the roof. When pressure increases in the carpal tunnel, the nerves are compressed. The pressure on the nerve can produce tingling, numbness, weakness and pain. Treatment options for carpal tunnel are splinting, injections, medications and finally surgery.

 slide 2cubital-tunnel

CUBITAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome occures where there is pressure placed on the ulnar nerve usually at the outside of the elbow. The ulnar nerve runs from the spinal cord through the arm around the elbow and into the fingers. The ulnar nerve passes over the outside edge of the elbow as it heads toward the fingers. If a person hit the outside of his elbow, (this area is commonly known as the funny bone), it irritates the ulnar nerve and gives a brief tingling feeling. Cubital Tunnel Syndrome occurs when the ulnar nerve is stretched, causing pressure on the nerve, usually when a person bends his arm and the ulnar nerve is stretched against a boney bump on the outside of the elbow.

If conservative treatment options fail to correct the problem, then surgery is required to fix this condition, and there are generally two types of surgeries:

1. An ulnar nerve transposition. In that procedure, the surgeon surgically moves the nerve away from the outside of the elbow so when the elbow is bent, it is not stretched over the boney area of the elbow.

2. The other type of surgery is called a medial epicondylectomy. In that procedure, the surgeon will remove part of the bony material on the outside of the elbow which causes the nerve to stretch when a person bends their elbow.

 bicep tendon rupture

BICEP TENDON RUPTURE

A bicep tendon rupture occurs when the tendons attaching the bicep muscle are torn. This type of injury is commonly caused by a single traumatic event. Most bicep tendon ruptures occur in men between 40 and 60 years of old and are usually incurred lifting a heavy object while the elbow is bent at a 90 degree angle. Statistically, a person’s dominant arm is the one most likely to be injured in a bicep tendon rupture.

The bicep muscle is connected to the shoulder at one end and the elbow at the other. The vast majority of bicep tendon tears occur where the bicep muscle attaches to the shoulder (over 90% of the time). In the rare occasion when the ruptured bicep tendon occurs near the elbow, usually results in a complete loss of use of the bicep muscle. The surgery required to fix the bicep tendon rupture is called a tenodesis. This is where the surgeon reattaches the torn section of the tendon to the bone. Generally, outcomes after the surgery are best when the surgery is performed within four (4) weeks of the bicep tendon rupture.

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